Workforce

Workforce

To prosper economically and sustain a high quality of life, metropolitan Chicago needs a well-educated and diverse workforce with the knowledge and ingenuity to drive future growth. Barriers that impede residents from fully participating in the regional economy undercut one of the region’s primary assets -- its human capital. The region is in constant competition with other metropolitan areas to attract both businesses and skilled workers. ON TO 2050 calls on the region to take deliberate steps to bridge the gaps between adults seeking to build a career and employers looking to build their workforce.

However, there are significant challenges to achieving this goal. Numerous measures of economic well-being by race and ethnicity show how the region falls short of ensuring equitable opportunity for all residents, and thus falls short of performing to its full potential. Black and Hispanic residents in particular experience persistent disparities in educational attainment, employment, household income, and other indicators. Over time, these challenges limit the pace and durability of the region’s economic growth, while also impeding efforts to reduce poverty or create opportunity.

Our complex education and workforce development systems must become more strategic and demand-driven in the face of uncertain future labor market shifts. Coordination and communication among institutional partners and between these institutions and employers is limited. As the rate of economic and technological change grows, individuals increasingly need to learn new skills and be retrained multiple times, making responsive and coordinated systems for education and training increasingly important.

Click below to see an interactive graphic comparing racial and ethnic disparities in economic outcomes across U.S. regions.

Screenshot of the disparate outcomes interactive graphic

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Workforce

To prosper economically and sustain a high quality of life, metropolitan Chicago needs a well-educated and diverse workforce with the knowledge and ingenuity to drive future growth. Barriers that impede residents from fully participating in the regional economy undercut one of the region’s primary assets -- its human capital. The region is in constant competition with other metropolitan areas to attract both businesses and skilled workers. ON TO 2050 calls on the region to take deliberate steps to bridge the gaps between adults seeking to build a career and employers looking to build their workforce.

However, there are significant challenges to achieving this goal. Numerous measures of economic well-being by race and ethnicity show how the region falls short of ensuring equitable opportunity for all residents, and thus falls short of performing to its full potential. Black and Hispanic residents in particular experience persistent disparities in educational attainment, employment, household income, and other indicators. Over time, these challenges limit the pace and durability of the region’s economic growth, while also impeding efforts to reduce poverty or create opportunity.

Our complex education and workforce development systems must become more strategic and demand-driven in the face of uncertain future labor market shifts. Coordination and communication among institutional partners and between these institutions and employers is limited. As the rate of economic and technological change grows, individuals increasingly need to learn new skills and be retrained multiple times, making responsive and coordinated systems for education and training increasingly important.

Click below to see an interactive graphic comparing racial and ethnic disparities in economic outcomes across U.S. regions.

Screenshot of the disparate outcomes interactive graphic

To Top

Asset Publisher

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Public engagement remains a core element to the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning’s Local Technical Assistance program, and our commitment to eliciting feedback from residents and...
In response to heightened protests against persistent anti-Black racism in our nation and region, the executive director and board at the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning recently released...
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“There’s an opportunity right now for a massive infrastructure investment plan that would upgrade electricity systems and public transportation, and electrify our industries. That could create...
Fewer people in northeastern Illinois are filling out the census, putting the region at risk of a costly undercount. A new analysis of 2020 census data by the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for...
Apartments, townhouses, and other multifamily housing developments are cropping up along North Avenue in western Cook County. The activity shows renewed interest in a once vibrant commercial...
Many Latinx residents receive information through their churches or at social service agencies and community meetings that provide materials printed in Spanish. Unfortunately, many of these places...
Younger generations are favoring biking, walking, and public transit over cars more than they did a decade ago. Lower income households are traveling more. More workers are...
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Studies have shown that Latinx communities have a higher rate of confirmed COVID-19 cases than any other racial group, in part, due to employment and housing patterns. Community leaders must...
CMAP’s newly released My Daily Travel survey shows generational differences in travel behavior and a rise in telecommuting even before the pandemic began. The household travel survey also includes...
Online submission systems are more efficient. They allow residents to submit at their convenience, municipalities to gather permits in a searchable database, and staff to reduce data processing and...
Media Coverage ...
Metropolitan Chicago’s Traded Industry Clusters ...
Garfield Green Line South Action Plan ...
Human & Community Development Committee Materials ...
Coordinating Committee