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Methodology and Data Sources for CMAP's Regional Snapshot

The CMAP Regional Snapshot is meant to depict where the region stands in measurable terms, regarding fundamental issues that will shape our communities in years to come. Numerous partners across the region have done much good work to quantify the status and needs of metropolitan Chicago; CMAP's role is to coordinate and enhance activities across those areas while promoting regional priorities. The Regional Snapshot is not intended as an all-encompassing overview of northeastern Illinois. It is instead a short encapsulation of selected data points and trends that shed light on issues that have been identified as priorities in the region. Click here to download the Regional Snapshot (9MB PDF).

For more about the Regional Snapshot in general, call Tom Garritano at 312-386-8609.

Regional Snapshot Methodology and Sources

For consistency when comparing the Chicago region with its U.S. peers, we have selected Dallas, Los Angeles, New York, and Philadelphia, which make up the top five cities in terms of population. Unless noted, data refer to metropolitan Chicago as a whole, and to the other cities' broader metropolitan areas, too. U.S. metropolitan regions are defined by Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs), Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Areas (CMSAs), or Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), depending on data availability.

CBSAs, CMSAs, and MSAs are large metropolitan regions that include one or more primary urban centers, as defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for use by federal statistical agencies. The Chicago CBSA includes the Chicago, Naperville, Joliet metro area, as well as the metro areas surrounding Gary, Indiana and Kenosha County, Wisconsin.. Detailed descriptions of each type of metro region begin on page 9 of this document. For international comparisons, the selected peer group includes Berlin, London, Paris, and Tokyo and data are reported by metropolitan regions referred to as agglomerations.

Figure 1: Comparison of total units of local government (1997 by CMSA)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1997 Census of Governments

http://www.census.gov/govs/www/cog.html

Figure 2: Metropolitan Chicago, "By the Numbers"

Sources:Texas Transportation Institute (as to residents' spending 253 million hours and 151 million gallons of fuel sitting in traffic jams, at a cost to the region of $4 billion annually);

Chicago Area Transportation Study (80 percent increase of freight traffic in northeastern Illinois over the next two decades);
U.S. Census (estimates of housing costs and household incomes);
Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission (estimates of future population growth, aging population, and water usage).

Figure 3: Estimated total population (2006 by CMSA)

U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division

Table 1: Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States, Regions, and States and for Puerto Rico: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006 (NST-EST2006-01)

Release Date: December 22, 2006

Note: The Census Bureau 2005 population estimate for CMAP's 7-county region is 8.4 million. This figure includes population estimates by CBSA geography, which, for Chicago, is larger than the CMAP region.

Figure 4: Estimated total population (international comparison)

Source for Chicago region data (2006 by CBSA): Table 1: Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States, Regions, and States and for Puerto Rico: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006 (NST-EST2006-01)

Source: Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau

Release Date: December 22, 2006

Note: The Census Bureau 2005 population estimate for CMAP's 7-county region is 8.4 million. This figure includes population estimates by CBSA geography, which, for Chicago, is larger than the CMAP region.

Source for Berlin region, London region, Paris region, and Tokyo region data (2006 by agglomeration as defined below):

Th. Brinkhoff: The Principal Agglomerations of the World,
http://www.citypopulation.de, 2006-11-22

Agglomerations include a central city and neighboring communities linked to it (e.g.) by continuous built-up areas or commuters. Some agglomerations have more than one central city (e.g. "The Ruhr"). Official censuses and estimations are mostly the basis of the presented figures; the definitions of agglomerations are sometimes based on unofficial or own estimates. The population figures of the agglomerations and cities are computed for following date: 2006-11-22. The figures of such a statistic are all of varying, and some of suspect accuracy. There are several reasons: the varying relevance and accuracy of sources, the poor comparability of definitions of agglomerations, errors in the projections and so on. Nevertheless, the population figures presented on this page are more relevant and more comparable than most of the data presented elsewhere. If you know more current figures or if you have suggestions for improving this web site, please contact me. You are allowed using the population figures presented in the following table if following reference is added:

Figure 5: Population density (2005 by CBSA)

Land Area Data:

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Geography Division

U.S. Gazetteer 2000

County data aggregated to CBSA data

Population Data:

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division

2005 Population Estimates Program

Table 1: Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2005 (CBSA-EST2005-01)

Release Date: August 21, 2006

Figure 6: Population change by county, 1990-2000 (1990 and 2000 by county)

Source 1: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1990

P001. PERSONS - Universe: Persons
Data Set: 1990 Summary Tape File 1 (STF 1) - 100-Percent data

NOTE: For information on confidentiality, nonsampling error, and definitions, see http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/datanotes/expstf190.htm.

Accuracy for this data set: http://factfinder.census.gov/metadoc/stf1appc.pdf

Source 2: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

P1. TOTAL POPULATION [1] - Universe: Total population
Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data

Accuracy for this dataset: http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/doc/sf1chap8.pdf

NOTE: For information on confidentiality protection, nonsampling error, definitions, and count corrections see http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/datanotes/expsf1u.htm.

Figure 7: Percent of population that immigrated from another country, 2000-20005 (2000 and 2005 by CBSA)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division
2005 Population Estimates Program
Release Date: March 16, 2006
CO-EST2005-alldata: County Population Estimates and Estimated Components of
Change: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2005

Figure 8: Race and ethnicity growth (2005 by CBSA)

Source: US Census Bureau, Population Division
2005 Population Estimates Program
Release Date: March 16, 2006
CO-EST2005-alldata: County Population Estimates and Estimated Components of
Change: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2005
Derived by aggregating county data into CBSAs

Figure 9: Age of population by percentage (2005 by MSA)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division
2005 Population Estimates Program
Release Date: August 4, 2006
CC-EST2005-alldata-[STFIPS]: County Population Estimates by Age, Sex, Race and
Hispanic Origin: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2005

Figure 10: Median household income (1999 by CMSA)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

P53. MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1999 (DOLLARS) [1] - Universe: Households

Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) - Sample Data

NOTE: Data based on a sample except in P3, P4, H3, and H4. For information on confidentiality protection, sampling error, nonsampling error, definitions, and count corrections see http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/datanotes/expsf3.htm.

Figure 11: Percent of total population with incomes below poverty level (1999 by CMSA)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

P87: POVERTY STATUS IN 1999 BY AGE [17] – Universe: Population for whom poverty status is determined

Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) – Sample Data

NOTE: Data based on a sample except in P3, P4, H3, and H4. For information on confidentiality protection, sampling error, nonsampling error, definitions, and count corrections see http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/datanotes/expsf3.htm.

Figure 12: Percent of population age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or more (2005 by CBSA)

Source: US Census Bureau, 2005 American Community Survey (ACS)

Selected Social Characteristics in the United State: 2005

NOTE. Data are limited to the household population and exclude the population living in institutions, college dormitories, and other group quarters. For information on confidentiality protection, sampling error, nonsampling error, and definitions, see http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/datanotes/exp_acs2005.html

Figure 13: Educational level by county, persons age 25 and over (2005 by CBSA)

Selected Social Characteristics in the United State: 2005

NOTE. Data are limited to the household population and exclude the population living in institutions, college dormitories, and other group quarters. For information on confidentiality protection, sampling error, nonsampling error, and definitions, see http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/datanotes/exp_acs2005.html

Figure 14: Land-use proportions by sub-region (2001 by CMSA)

Source: CMAP Data Bulletin: 2001 Land-use Inventory for Northeastern Illinois, September 2006. Available in PDF format from CMAP.

Figure 15: Changes in land use, 1990-2001 (2001 by CMSA)

Source: CMAP Data Bulletin: 2001 Land-use Inventory for Northeastern Illinois, September 2006. Available in PDF format from CMAP.

Figure 16: Projected water use by sector (2000 and 2025 by county)

Source: Dziegielewski et al. 2005, Contract Report for Illinois State Water Survey pp. 9-12.

Figure 17: Northeastern Illinois water sources

Source: Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, 2006.

Figure 18: Air quality (2005 by MSA)

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

http://www.epa.gov/air/airtrends/factbook.html

last updated on Tuesday, October 3rd, 2006

Figure 19: Sum of acres in protected areas, by community type (1999 by county)

Source: Chicago Wilderness Biodiversity Recovery Plan, 1999, p. 40

Available for download at http://www.chicagowilderness.org/pubprod/brp/index.cfm

Figure 20: Highway network

Source: Chicago Area Transportation Study, Transportation Conformity Study, October 2006

Figure 21: Transit network

Source: Chicago Area Transportation Study, Transportation Conformity Study, October 2006

Figure 22: Means of travel to work (2000 by City and CBSA)

U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

P30. MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION TO WORK FOR WORKERS 16 YEARS AND OVER [16] - Universe: Workers 16 years and over

Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) - Sample Data

NOTE: Data based on a sample except in P3, P4, H3, and H4. For information on confidentiality protection, sampling error, nonsampling error, definitions, and count corrections see http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/datanotes/expsf3.htm

Figure 23: Transit ridership, 1980 – 2005 (1980 – 2005 by 6-county RTA service area)

Source: Regional Transportation Authority (RTA), Regional Transportation Asset Management System (RTAMS). http://www.rtams.org/ui/homepage.asp

Figure 24: Tons of freight by metropolitan region (2002 by CBSA)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Commodity Flow Survey

MA Table 1. Shipment Characteristics by Mode of Transportation for CBSA of Origin: 2002

MA Table 2. Inbound Shipment Characteristics by Mode of Transportation for CBSA of Destination: 2002

http://www.census.gov/svsd/www/cfsdat/cfsdatauser.htm

Figure 25: Airport passenger traffic (2005 by airport)

Sources: Airports Council International and Philadelphia International Airport, 2005

Figure 26: Airport cargo traffic (2005 by airport)

Sources: Airports Council International and Philadelphia International Airport, 2005

Figure 27: Northeastern Illinois commute times (2000 by CMSA)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

P31. TRAVEL TIME TO WORK FOR WORKERS 16 YEARS AND OVER [15] - Universe: Workers 16 years and over

Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) - Sample Data

NOTE: Data based on a sample except in P3, P4, H3, and H4. For information on confidentiality protection, sampling error, nonsampling error, definitions, and count corrections see http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/datanotes/expsf3.htm.

Note: Prior to Census 2000, the questionnaire permitted respondents to mark no more than two digits for their travel time, limiting reported travel time to 99 minutes. Three digits were made available in the Census 2000 questionnaire, reflecting the greater frequency of extremely long commutes. As a result, it is estimated that about 1 minute of the 3.1 minute increase for the Nation between 1990 and 2000 was due to this change in methodology (Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Journey to Work 2000. Census 2000 Brief. U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, U.S. Census Bureau. March 2004).

Figure 28: Commute times by city and region (2000 by CMSA)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

P31. TRAVEL TIME TO WORK FOR WORKERS 16 YEARS AND OVER [15] - Universe: Workers 16 years and over

Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) - Sample Data

NOTE: Data based on a sample except in P3, P4, H3, and H4. For information on confidentiality protection, sampling error, nonsampling error, definitions, and count corrections see http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/datanotes/expsf3.htm

Figure 29: Number of fortune 500 headquarters (2006)

Sources: World Business Chicago and Fortune Magazine, April 2006

Figure 30: Gross product, combined national and regional comparisons (2004)

Source: U.S. Conference of Mayors

Figure 31: Industries that gained jobs, 2000 – 2006 (2000 – 2006 by 7-county CMAP service area)

Source: Illinois Department of Employment Security, http://lmi.ided.state.il.us./covered.htm

Data is compiled by IDES using quarterly tax returns submitted by employers in accordance with ES-202 federal guidelines.

Figure 32: Percent change in industry and employment sector for 7-county Chicago region, 2001-2006 (2001 – 2006 by CMAP service area)

Source: Illinois Department of Employment Security, http://lmi.ided.state.il.us./covered.htm

Data is compiled by IDES using quarterly tax returns submitted by employers in accordance with ES-202 federal guidelines

Figure 33: Major employment categories in Northeastern Illinois (by CMAP service area)

Source 1: Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission (NIPC), Patterns of Change, 2004, p. 22

Source 2: Matt Eskew and Paul Kleppner, "The Future of High Wage Jobs in Illinois," State of Working Illinois Policy Brief, Northern Illinois University, August 2006.

Figure 34: Top ten industries in seven-county region (2006 by CMAP service area)

Source: Illinois Department of Employment Security, http://lmi.ided.state.il.us./covered.htm

Data is compiled by IDES using quarterly tax returns submitted by employers in accordance with ES-202 federal guidelines

Figure 35: Population and housing growth, 2000-2005 (2000 and 2005 by CBSA)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division
2005 Population Estimates Program
Release Date: August 4, 2006
CC-EST2005-alldata-[STFIPS]: County Population Estimates by Age, Sex, Race and
Hispanic Origin: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2005
County data aggregated to CBSAs

Figure 36: Percent of population paying at least 30 percent of their monthly income on housing costs (2005 by county)

Source: US Census Bureau, 2005 American Community Survey (ACS)

Selected Housing Characteristics in the United State: 2005

NOTE. Data are limited to the household population and exclude the population living in institutions, college dormitories, and other group quarters. For information on confidentiality protection, sampling error, nonsampling error, and definitions, see http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/datanotes/exp_acs2005.html

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